Cafe-Restaurant "Græsk Smag"

Vesterbrogade 109, Copenhagen, tel. +45 33318886

Bougatsa

History

The origin of bougatsa, according to reports, comes from the geographical area of Byzantium. More specifically, it seems to have come from Constantinople, when it was still Greek, that is, before 1453 A.D.

The name “bougatsa”, comes from the Ottoman word “pogatsa” (an alteration of the Latin word “foccacia”=sweet pie) and was used to describe a “salty or sweet pie filling, wrapped very well and tightly in the dough”.

Even after the fall of Byzantium, the bougatsa still exceled, according to 16th and 17th century travel testimony. Traveler Evlia Tselebi reports that in Constantinople (Istanbul as it is called today) two bakeries prepared “bougatsa kuru” (dry, fat-free dough), “kigmali” (bougatsa with minced meat), peinirli (bougatsa with cheese) and “sante bougatsa” (sprinkled with powdered sugar).

The pies became very popular in Greece after the Asia Minor catastrophe; from the northern Greece to Peloponnese and Crete. Especially in Thessaloniki and Serres where many refugees from Asia Minor settled.

In 1917, the Union of bougatsa makers of Thessaloniki was founded and two years later it gathered 51 members, a number that was not negligible. After 1922, the spread of bougatsa in Greece accelerated and its art evolved.

Today, despite its long path through history, bougatsa is still a daily desirable delicacy with loyal fans and, as it seems, its future is as rich as its taste. Nowadays there are quite a few different kinds of bougatsa; with cream, with cheese, with minced meat and others.

We offer only bougatsa with cream which is the most popular of all.

The origin of bougatsa, according to reports, comes from the geographical area of Byzantium. More specifically, it seems to have come from Constantinople, when it was still Greek, that is, before 1453 A.D.

The name “bougatsa”, comes from the Ottoman word “pogatsa” (an alteration of the Latin word “foccacia”=sweet pie) and was used to describe a “salty or sweet pie filling, wrapped very well and tightly in the dough”.

Even after the fall of Byzantium, the bougatsa still exceled, according to 16th and 17th century travel testimony. Traveler Evlia Tselebi reports that in Constantinople (Istanbul as it is called today) two bakeries prepared “bougatsa kuru” (dry, fat-free dough), “kigmali” (bougatsa with minced meat), peinirli (bougatsa with cheese) and “sante bougatsa” (sprinkled with powdered sugar).

The pies became very popular in Greece after the Asia Minor catastrophe; from the northern Greece to Peloponnese and Crete. Especially in Thessaloniki and Serres where many refugees from Asia Minor settled.

In 1917, the Union of bougatsa makers of Thessaloniki was founded and two years later it gathered 51 members, a number that was not negligible. After 1922, the spread of bougatsa in Greece accelerated and its art evolved.

Today, despite its long path through history, bougatsa is still a daily desirable delicacy with loyal fans and, as it seems, its future is as rich as its taste. Nowadays there are quite a few different kinds of bougatsa; with cream, with cheese, with minced meat and others. We offer only bougatsa with cream which is the most popular of all.

The origin of bougatsa, according to reports, comes from the geographical area of Byzantium. More specifically, it seems to have come from Constantinople, when it was still Greek, that is, before 1453 A.D.

The name “bougatsa”, comes from the Ottoman word “pogatsa” (an alteration of the Latin word “foccacia”=sweet pie) and was used to describe a “salty or sweet pie filling, wrapped very well and tightly in the dough”.

Even after the fall of Byzantium, the bougatsa still exceled, according to 16th and 17th century travel testimony. Traveler Evlia Tselebi reports that in Constantinople (Istanbul as it is called today) two bakeries prepared “bougatsa kuru” (dry, fat-free dough), “kigmali” (bougatsa with minced meat), peinirli (bougatsa with cheese) and “sante bougatsa” (sprinkled with powdered sugar).

The pies became very popular in Greece after the Asia Minor catastrophe; from the northern Greece to Peloponnese and Crete. Especially in Thessaloniki and Serres where many refugees from Asia Minor settled.

In 1917, the Union of bougatsa makers of Thessaloniki was founded and two years later it gathered 51 members, a number that was not negligible. After 1922, the spread of bougatsa in Greece accelerated and its art evolved.

Today, despite its long path through history, bougatsa is still a daily desirable delicacy with loyal fans and, as it seems, its future is as rich as its taste. Nowadays there are quite a few different kinds of bougatsa; with cream, with cheese, with minced meat and others. We offer only bougatsa with cream which is the most popular of all.

Preparation

In the process of making  the bougatsa, the most important thing is for the dough to be perfect. To succeed in this, you will need flour, oil, and soft vegetable butter of the best quality.

In traditional bougatsa shops, the only electrical machine you need is the dough mixer. After the dough has been kneaded, the process until the final product requires working with bare hands.

After the dough is ready, it is separated  in small balls which are sprinkled with oil and butter and are left for a few hours to soften. At the beginning, the craftsman presses and widens the ball, until it reaches the size of the base of a small pizza. Then he starts lifting it from the counter in the air (it is called “air sheet”), 3-7 times for each pastry sheet, until it becomes thin and get the desired dimensions.

At the end of the process, the craftsman using his experience and skills, transforms the small ball of dough into a perfect and very thin layer  with dimensions of approximately 1.5 x 2 meters! Then, he simply “traps” the sweet or savory filling in the pastry sheet.

In the process of making  the bougatsa, the most important thing is for the dough to be perfect. To succeed in this, you will need flour, oil, and soft vegetable butter of the best quality.

In traditional bougatsa shops, the only electrical machine you need is the dough mixer. After the dough has been kneaded, the process until the final product requires working with bare hands.

After the dough is ready, it is separated  in small balls which are sprinkled with oil and butter and are left for a few hours to soften. At the beginning, the craftsman presses and widens the ball, until it reaches the size of the base of a small pizza. Then he starts lifting it from the counter in the air (it is called “air sheet”), 3-7 times for each pastry sheet, until it becomes thin and get the desired dimensions.

At the end of the process, the craftsman using his experience and skills, transforms the small ball of dough into a perfect and very thin layer  with dimensions of approximately 1.5 x 2 meters! Then, he simply “traps” the sweet or savory filling in the pastry sheet.

In the process of making  the bougatsa, the most important thing is for the dough to be perfect. To succeed in this, you will need flour, oil, and soft vegetable butter of the best quality.

In traditional bougatsa shops, the only electrical machine you need is the dough mixer. After the dough has been kneaded, the process until the final product requires working with bare hands.

After the dough is ready, it is separated  in small balls which are sprinkled with oil and butter and are left for a few hours to soften. At the beginning, the craftsman presses and widens the ball, until it reaches the size of the base of a small pizza. Then he starts lifting it from the counter in the air (it is called “air sheet”), 3-7 times for each pastry sheet, until it becomes thin and get the desired dimensions.

At the end of the process, the craftsman using his experience and skills, transforms the small ball of dough into a perfect and very thin layer  with dimensions of approximately 1.5 x 2 meters! Then, he simply “traps” the sweet or savory filling in the pastry sheet.